Maunie of Ardwall

Maunie of Ardwall

Fri May 25 4:21 2018 NZST
Run: 10728.5nm (19418.6km)
Avg: 31840.6knts
24hr: 764173.5nm
33 51.246s 151 07.377e
Weather: drizzle, wind SSW 20-25 knots

Anchored in Hen & Chicken Bay for the strong southerly to roll in at around midnight. Only 2.5m depth of water but said to be very good holding in mud, according to the pilot book. Well, we dragged, very slowly, about 1000ft until the anchor finally settled into something firmer. Thankfully we had plenty of space around us

Well this is a surprising return to the Southern Hemisphere! Are you missing us all. Actually just as well you did not beam yourselves to NZ as we have truely shitty weather. Nice to see your reports from time to time. Patricia
Fri May 25 4:01 2018 NZST
Run: 101.8nm (184.3km)
50 21.314n 3 34.383w

Maunie is back home! We arrived to tie up to our mooring in Dartmouth at 1440 after an eight hour passage from Weymouth. We started the day flying the Irish Flag spinnaker and wonderful beam reach sailing. Sadly the wind only lasted for a few hours before we resorted to motor sailing. We were entertained by the navy chatting to various boats as they passed within their firing practice range, a tiny bird joining us as additional crew mid passage and finally Laura's excitement at spotting two dolphins as we approached the entrance to Dartmouth. Perhaps it was a welcome home! Ok so we'd have preferred to sail Maunie all the way around the World but it's still nice to be back here! All very well aboard.

Fri May 11 9:22 2018 NZST
Run: 10628.4nm (19237.4km)
Avg: 8.7knts
24hr: 209.1nm
50 52.40n 1 24.04w
Weather: SW 10 knots, 20% cloud cover, cold, 1020mb

Maunie is back in British waters! After 6 weeks on the deck of the mv Dmagracht she looked remarkably clean and untroubled by all those sea miles. The unloading process was way more entertaining (if equally nerve-wracking) than the loading because we were allowed onto the deck of the ship to get Maunie ready for the lift (backstays removed, fenders and lines set). A worrying few minutes trying to free a seized padlock on the main hatch was the only glitch in an otherwise very smooth process.
We are now in Hythe Marina, across the water from Southampton docks, for a few days to refit halyards, sails and canvas. All is very well aboard, though it's only about 10 degrees C!

A busy deck
A busy deck
We have lift off
We have lift off
Ready to splash
Ready to splash

Congrats on a safe passage home. And oh, such speed... Great to hear you are all now safely home.
Wed Mar 21 14:40 2018 NZDT
Run: 74.7nm (135.2km)
Avg: 396.1knts
24hr: 9505.3nm
33 51.246s 151 07.377e
Weather: drizzle, wind SSW 20-25 knots

Anchored in Hen & Chicken Bay for the strong southerly to roll in at around midnight. Only 2.5m depth of water but said to be very good holding in mud, according to the pilot book. Well, we dragged, very slowly, about 1000ft until the anchor finally settled into something firmer. Thankfully we had plenty of space around us

Wed Mar 21 14:29 2018 NZDT
Run: 74.7nm (135.2km)
32 55.322s 151 46.725e
Weather: 100% cloud, heavy rain 25 - 30 knot SE

Well, this is sad - our last YIT report from the southern hemisphere! We're in Newcastle Marina (and have been for a couple of weeks) waiting for the ship mv Damgracht to arrive. We're loading Maunie aboard in the next day or so and she'll retrace her wake across the Pacific and through the Panama Canal, arriving in Southampton sometime in May. The voyage from the UK has been amazing and we've been away for nearly six years so we can't complain about having to return to work. Of course, we'll miss the live-aboard cruising and the sunshine hugely but at least we'll have Maunie back on her mooring in Dartmouth for weekends and occasional longer trips.
Our final couple of days aboard are in driving rain and near gale-force winds, designed, perhaps, to make us feel better about stepping off the boat that's been our wonderful home for so long. So long to all our cruising mates, it's been great knowing you - we suspect we'll be back!

Thu Feb 1 20:15 2018 NZDT
33 51.246s 151 07.377e
Weather: drizzle, wind SSW 20-25 knots

Anchored in Hen & Chicken Bay for the strong southerly to roll in at around midnight. Only 2.5m depth of water but said to be very good holding in mud, according to the pilot book. Well, we dragged, very slowly, about 1000ft until the anchor finally settled into something firmer. Thankfully we had plenty of space around us

Thu Feb 1 20:12 2018 NZDT
Run: 8.1nm (14.7km)
Avg: 1041.4knts
24hr: 24994.3nm
33 51.246s 151 07.377e
Weather: drizzle, wind SSW 20-25 knots

Anchored in Hen & Chicken Bay for the strong southerly to roll in at around midnight. Only 2.5m depth of water but said to be very good holding in mud, according to the pilot book. Well, we dragged, very slowly, about 1000ft until the anchor finally settled into something firmer. Thankfully we had plenty of space around us

Thu Feb 1 20:12 2018 NZDT
Run: 1.8nm (3.3km)
33 52.022s 151 15.818e
Weather: 80% cloud cover, S 15 knots

Our final sail under the Harbour Bridge as we beat out to Rose Bay this afternoon. Anchored in 6.5m in calm water. Heading north to Pittwater tomorrow, but we will be sorry to leave Sydney.

Sun Jan 28 20:04 2018 NZDT
Run: 5.3nm (9.6km)
33 50.617s 151 16.635e
Weather: Sunshine, warm, light NE

On the only NSW Govt visitor's mooring in Watson's Bay - a tad rolly since it's pretty close to the route used by the high-speed ferries coming into the wharf but easy access to the beach. A great walk up to The Gap, overlooking the ocean, and then to the end of South Head

Sun Jan 14 9:50 2018 NZDT
Run: 7nm (12.7km)
33 46.667s 151 13.891e
Weather: 80% cloud cover, wind 15-20 knots SSW, 1008mb

In beautiful Bantry Bay on visitors' mooring. We moved here at 07.00 after an event-filled night. We were on a visitors' mooring just upstream of the Spit Bridge and a 50ft light-displacement motorboat came and took the neighbouring one. At 04.00 the wind picked up, with some heavy gusts, and the motorboat was shearing around the mooring like a crazy thing ? we woke up as we collided. He swung against our stern, damaging the Windpilot (a broken aluminium casting) but no one aboard their boat woke up! When we told them this morning they seemed very unconcerned, in spite of the scratches down their side ? ?It?s not our boat? said the woman in the cockpit.

Hi there, from frozen Aberdeenshire! Have to say that having an attempt to steal your dinghy, and suffer damage to your windpilot by a chartered motor boat doesn't sound all that great. But I bet the sun is shining and and the beer is cold. Enjoy summer, we're envious! A & C XX
Thu Jan 11 17:44 2018 NZDT
Run: 5.9nm (10.7km)
33 52.363s 151 11.208e

In Blackwattle Bay. Shocked to find the rigging-wire, used to lock the dinghy to the public pontoon, had been severed somewhere between 11.00 and 14.00. The thief abandoned the boat when he / she couldn't start the engine; luckily the wind just blew it against the seawall. A river police boat came by so we registered the event with them so they said they'd step up patrols in the area.
We are very relieved not to have lost the dinghy; thank goodness we always take the kill-cord off the motor.

Fri Jan 5 20:24 2018 NZDT
Run: 3.4nm (6.2km)
33 47.522s 151 13.219e

After a few days anchored in Blackwattle Bay (handy for the fantastic fish market), we opted for a complete change of scene. With winds averaging 15 kts, we had perfect sailing conditions for a beat into Middle Harbour. Arriving early for the 14.15 opening of the Spit Bridge, we took one of the visitor buoys. Once through the bridge, we motored up to the beautiful Castle Cove and anchored in 9 metres. The scenery is stunning so all is very well on board.

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